Archive for the ‘winter marquees’ Category

Case study: Mr Jones wants to cover as much of his garden with marquees as possible

Monday, November 24th, 2014

We recently had a visit by a Mr Jones, he was planning a party and wanted to extend his house in to the garden using marquees. This is a pretty common scenario for marquee hire companies especially during the winter months.

Mr Jones came in with a diagram of his garden with the marquees he thought he need, two 4x6m marquees, one 3.6×3.6m pagoda and one walkway:

Jones01

The garden is not easy as it’s a very funny shape and on the surface this looks to do the job. My concerns were:

  • Weathering to the house would be difficult. The 4x6m marquee against the house should at least be a 6x4m one for ease of weathering. A pagoda is sloped on all 4 sides and so difficult to weather against a house.
  • There would be many joins. This is not a problem regarding weatherproofing with our guttering kits but it can be a hindrance to party atmosphere and circulation. The risk is the end 4x6m marquee would feel cut-off and under-used (note if this layout went ahead a good suggestion would be to put the food and/or drink in this 4x6m to ensure it is used).
  • Walkways are ideal for connecting marquees together but in this scenario you aren’t really gaining any useable space by having the walkway in the middle there. It’s a bit like a sideways corridor.

So having explained all of this I suggested an alternative approach, a 4x12m marquee and a 4x4m marquee on the side:

Jones02

  • This is much easier to weather against the house (both marquees would have their flat gables towards the house)
  • There is only one join and it is much easier to weather the two marquees side by side
  • You have a larger main area for the guests to circulate.

Note that in this example Mr Jones is actually ending up with slightly less of his garden covered and my alternative option is cheaper than his original suggestion. I can however guarantee that this second idea will be an improvement on the atmosphere and circulation of the party.

As mentioned in other articles I would still recommend having the food and drink out in the marquee (maybe at the far end). People (especially blokes) linger by the bar, having the food and drink outside guarantees the marquees are used fully and everyone doesn’t end up in the kitchen.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Marquees in the winter

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

September is usually the last busy marquee month of the season. If you’re still very busy through October and the Christmas market then you’re doing very well. There is a change to the way people use marquees during the winter though:

  • Often customers are after gaining a room from the house for a party rather than hosting the whole function outside.
  • Obviously you need to provide plenty of marquee heating
  • Butt the marquee hard up against the house or use a walkway with sides
  • Allow more time to put the marquee up. It could be cold, wet and/or windy and the daylight hours are shorter
  • Allow more maintenance time between jobs, marquees need cleaning and drying unless they’re going straight back out
  • It’s tempting to raise the hire charge of the marquee due to the greater running costs but unfortunately the opposite is usually true, because winter is drastically quieter than summer for parties you often have to offer discounts or incentives to be competitive and get the work.
  • Buy some good waterproofs. We’re quite fortunate in that once the marquee is up we’re generally working in the dry doing all of the interior work but if you’re having to do that in wet clothes life is not fun. Get the marquee up quickly, get all the kit inside then it becomes a normal day whatever the weather outside (assuming you’ve got good quality marquees of course!)
  • We recommend testing any gutter before you leave site anyway but especially do so during the winter
  • If snow is forecast leave heating on very low to prevent it building up on the roof. UK marquees are not designed for snow loading.
  • edit: As the excellent County Marquees pointed out after posting wooden floors are a very popular option during the winter. Not only do they give a good surface but you are raising the height of the floor – a popular (but expensive) solution on soft ground prone to waterlogging or hard surfaces where water can come back under the sides.

In the main erecting winter marquees is a far more relaxed business than summer ones, the company is generally not as busy so you can take your time to get it right and ensure you’ve tried absolutely everything on the nearest sandwich shops menu.

Thanks for reading

Spencer