Archive for the ‘Marquee seating’ Category

Forgotten things to allow for in marquee weddings

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

You’ve put the wedding marquee up, it is perfectly finished and decorated and all of the furniture is laid out as per the flooring plan which gives a nice cosy but spacious feel to the marquee.

Then the customer comes out and says “Can we just fit this in somewhere” and life in the marquee gets a bit more cramped and complicated.

From experience there can be a wide variety of things that have to be fitted in somewhere but as usual it’s better to be prepared before the event (at the planning stage ideally though you cannot always allow for a bride’s last minute inspiration). The following are mainly from experience with wedding marquees but can also occur in other marquee events too:

  • Additional tables for hats and/or presents. Asking the question of where will they put ladies hats and any presents on the day can be done at the site visit and also show’s you’re being thorough with the planning.
  • Coat rails. During the summer any jackets would normally go on the backs of chairs but during winter months this should be allowed for (near the entrance if possible).
  • Cake table. Sounds obvious but I was on site once and asked “so where are we putting the cake” and hadn’t allowed for it anywhere. Easily corrected but still not a nice feeling.
  • Chocolate fountain. We had to fit one of these in last minute once and keep in mind that you need a fair amount of ‘splashing’ room around it that caused a few problems. A good tip – don’t put a chocolate fountain close to marquee linings, chocolate is a pain to get out afterwards.
  • DJ. Generally if a customer is having a dance floor you will allow space for a band or DJ automatically. But sometimes if a customer is having a band (which you’ve allowed for) they will also have a DJ (not originally mentioned or allowed for) to fill in between sets. If a customer is having a band just make sure they’re not having a DJ too.
  • PA system though this doesn’t take up too much space
  • Bar – a few times we had customers who had built their own bars and needed to fit them in to the marquee somewhere. Invariably this takes up a lot more room than a simple trestle table style bar.

That’s all I can think of though this post might be edited as more occur to me!

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Different top table options in wedding marquees

Monday, July 15th, 2013

As a marquee hire company you need to offer your customers choice. One particular decision is what type of top table to use at a wedding. Not only do you need to offer different options but you also need to be able to discuss the pros and cons of each:

Traditional long table:

Usually made up of 3 6ft trestles with seating on one side and positioned on one side of the marquee.

  • Gives a traditional/formal feel to the seating layout
  • Easy for speeches
  • Easy for you to set up
  • Good for photographs with a marquee wall behind
  • Can be difficult to talk to best man/bridesmaid on the ends
  • Difficult to change the seating arrangements from bride, groom, parents, best man and bridesmaid(s)
  • People on the table are facing guests backs if the remaining seating is round tables
  • Space required in marquee: 3x6m

Round table:

Usually a 5ft, 5ft6in or 6ft round table in the middle of all the other round tables

  • Gives a very informal feel to the layout
  • Very social with other guests in all directions
  • Easy to change seating arrangements if circumstances require it (for eg no need to have parents/in-laws on the same table)
  • Not ideal for photographs
  • Not ideal for speeches (often having to walk to one side to make them)
  • Space required in marquee: 3x3m

Oval Table

Usually constructed of several trestle tables with a ‘D’ shape table at each end and positioned at one side of the marquee. Seating is usually in a horse-shoe on 3 sides leaving the front clear

  • more sociable option than a traditional top table (people at the ends are now facing towards the bride & groom)
  • can be formal or informal
  • leaving the front clear makes for good photographs
  • Surface can be uneven with so many tables next to each other on uneven ground
  • Space required in marquee: 3x6m

Remember a popular option is to have the top table on the dance floor. This means that all guests are positioned around the top table and when it is lifted away after the meal everyone is then automatically positioned around the dance floor. It’s best to use the top table for this as the idea is that everyone on it will spend the rest of the evening socialising.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Inflatable sofas

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Here’s something of interest: http://www.sofair.co.uk/

Inflatable sofas, if they are as good as they look then it could be an interesting option for the hire industry.

Hiring out sofas can be a pain, they take up a lot of room in transport and storage so having a collapsible inflating option could be an excellent idea.

I should point out I haven’t seen these in the flesh, the photos are obvious photoshops so this is probably quite new and there’s no mention of prices on the website (which really annoys me).

But it could be an interesting idea, maybe one to find at The Showmans Show in October.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

How much space is needed for a place setting?

Monday, September 5th, 2011

Unusual seating plans can call for some head-scratching calculations. 95% of the time people will want standard seating arrangements that you’ll have done many times before but just occasionally you get a someone who wants something a bit different. This generally involves unusual shapes or combinations of tables – you may hire them or make them yourself (bolting a custom made top to an existing table is the most common option). Here are some rules to help you plan:

Ideally you want a 2ft (60cm) wide space per person around the table. It can be a bit less if it’s a curved table (as people end up with more space further away from the table)

You also need to allow 2ft (60cm) for chairs around the table but that doesn’t allow space to walk between tables.

As an example take a 20ft/6m wide marquee that you would typically fit two round tables across in any layout. So 5ft round tables would then have an extra 2ft for the chairs, positioning them against the walls leaves a 2ft path down the middle.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Different types of top table

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

As a marquee hire company you need to offer your customers choice. One particular decision is what type of top table to use. Not only do you need to offer different options but you also need to be able to discuss the pros and cons of each:

Traditional long table:

Usually made up of 3 6ft trestles with seating on one side and positioned on one side of the marquee.

  • Gives a traditional/formal feel to the seating layout
  • Easy for speeches
  • Easy for you to set up
  • Good for photographs with a marquee wall behind
  • Can be difficult to talk to best man/bridesmaid on the ends
  • Difficult to change the seating arrangements from gridge, groom, parents, best man and bridesmaid(s)
  • People on the table are facing guests backs if the remaining seating is round tables
  • Space required in marquee: 3x6m

Round table:

Usually a 5ft, 5ft6in or 6ft round table in the middle of all the other round tables

  • Gives a very informal feel to the layout
  • Very social with other guests in all directions
  • Easy to change seating arrangements if circumstances require it (for eg no need to have parents/in-laws on the same table)
  • Not ideal for photographs
  • Not ideal for speeches (often having to walk to one side to make them)
  • Space required in marquee: 3x3m

Oval Table

Usually constructed of several trestle tables with a ‘D’ shape table at each end and positioned at one side of the marquee. Seating is usually in a horse-shoe on 3 sides leaving the front clear

  • more sociable option than a traditional top table (people at the ends are now facing towards the bride & groom)
  • can be formal or informal
  • leaving the front clear makes for good photographs
  • Surface can be uneven with so many tables next to each other on uneven ground
  • Space required in marquee: 3x6m

Remember a popular option is to have the top table on the dance floor. This means that all guests are positioned around the top table and when it is lifted away after the meal everyone is then automatically positioned around the dance floor. It’s best to use the top table for this as the idea is that everyone on it will spend the rest of the evening socialising.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Space required in a marquee

Monday, August 15th, 2011

When you plan a marquee event you need to know how much space to allow for furniture and other features. As a rough guide use 3x3m boxes:

  • For a 5ft round table seating 8-10 or a 5ft6in round table seating 9-11 guests allow one 3x3m square box
  • For a set of buffet tables (usually three 6ft trestles) allow 3x6m (ie two 3x3m boxes)
  • For a top table (tradition long table or an oval) allow 3x6m
  • DJ’s: 3x3m
  • Band: At least 3x6m depending on how many people are involved
  • Bar: 3x3m (often with another 3x3m for a sofa or spare seats)

Dance floors can vary in size depending on the type of event and number of guests so they’re a bit tricky.

Also consider leaving some space clear when people first walk in and in front of any catering entrance if you have the space to do so.

Of course you can just use our marquee planner or email us and one of us will put something together for you.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Theatre style seating in a marquee

Monday, August 24th, 2009
Theatre style marquee seating

How much room do you need for theatre style seating in a marquee?

If a customer comes along and says they want to hold a ceremony in one of your marquees, how are you going to work out the size they need?

Like most things to do with marquees it’s very easy, assuming you’re using standard chairs with no arms.

Allow 50cm wide for the chair, and 1m depth for the chair and persons legs.

In the photo above we used a 9m wide marquee with a 2m (fairly typical size) aisle down the middle. That leaves 3.5m each side, enough for 7 chairs.

The marquee was 18m long and the front 2m was left clear for the ceremony. That leaves 16m for chairs – each row takes up 1m so 16 rows of 14 chairs = 224 chairs. Quite a few more than sitting around tables for example!

If you’re a bit cramped for space try turning the layout round 90 degrees so the aisle comes in from the side. It doesn’t look as impressive but a shorter aisle means more space for seating.

Thanks for reading

Spencer