Archive for the ‘marquee linings’ Category

Why are most marquee linings ivory?

Monday, May 18th, 2015

In the UK marquee industry now just about all professional marquee linings are ivory, this has come about from years of experience and customer feedback not just from us but from all lining manufacturers in the country.

From a customer’s point of view ivory just adds a touch of class to the marquee, if you have two lined marquees side by side one with white and one ivory customers choose ivory every single time – whether they go for flat/shaped, pleated or rouched is personal opinion and another matter altogether!

From a hirers point of view ivory is much lower maintenance than white, marks and creases show up far more on white than ivory. It also ages better than white – we used to have 10 year old ivory linings right next to brand new ones without any issue. Try putting  a 10 year old white t-shirt next to a brand new one and see the difference!

The only down side to ivory used to be there were many many different shades of it from different material suppliers in the marquee lining industry, fortunately in the last 10 years or so everyone has settled on a similar shade generally referred to as mid-ivory.

That’s why 99% of professional marquee linings are ivory now.

Thanks for reading.

Spencer

How to look after marquee linings

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Marquee linings give a real wow factor to any marquee but they do need looking after. This means keeping them clean and as crease-free as possible.

Please note this advice is for the luxury marquee linings that we (and one or two others) manufacture here in the UK. It is not suitable for the cheap satin linings made in the far east.

How do I know if my linings are luxury or satin? Satin material is white/silver, very shiny and prone to wrinkling. Luxury lining material is usually (but not exclusively) ivory/cream with a matt finish.

Tips on looking after marquee linings:

  • Keep them dry. Just like marquee covers if you put linings away wet they will reappear mouldy.
  • The ideal way to store linings is neatly folded – that’s how we (and by we I mean the ladies here who are far better at this than the rest of us) store our linings here. However on site folding isn’t practical so the next best is to concertina the material and then roll it up. The last thing you want to be doing is scrunching up a lining to fit in to a bag or something. Luxury lining material is not as prone to creases as satin but if left for a long time scrunched up they will form.
  • Make sure your hands are clean before starting to play with any lining.
  • Keep the linings clean – if they’re dirty after a job put them to one side for cleaning.
  • Our linings can be washed in a normal domestic washing machine, they are inherently flame retardant so can be washed any number of times.
  • Stubborn mildew may need bleaching first (and then washed thoroughly)
  • Putting the linings up when they’re damp (ie straight out of the washing machine) means they dry in place and you don’t have any creases at all.
  • If you do have lots of creases in your lining then a steamer will get them out ( can take a while though!)
  • Have set bags for your linings, ideally ones that are colour coded – there is nothing worse than being at a job and finding you’ve packed the wrong size roof lining!
  • Most of the time dirt on linings comes from dirty hands when fitting, a dirty floor or in transport if not properly protected. Being thorough at these times will give your marquee a better standard of finish and avoid you being tied up regularly cleaning linings .

We have been manufacturing marquee linings for over 20 years, if you need any advice on linings (whether for our marquees or not) we are always happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Marquee & linings manufacturer

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

Most of the time this blog is used to offer help and advice for anyone on the marquee hire industry. Sometimes we use it to promote our new products and things (hey, we’ve got to pay the rent). Very occasionally we’ll use it for our own vanity, such as today. Feel free to stop reading now and come back next week 🙂

DIY Marquees is part of C & D King Ltd who started manufacturing in 1979 when my mum (the D in C & D) fired up her sewing machine. We’ve scaled up quite a bit from then (not that we make absolutely everything we sell obviously) but at a time when people have quite loose interpretations of the word ‘manufacturer’ it was good to get back to our roots recently:

Water Chariots (the 2012 Games Canal Boat Service) approached us to help convert their functional new boats in to vessels suitable for VIP trips. The difficulty came not just in the awkward shapes and sizes required but how to attach it to a boat when you can’t make any permanent fixings (and no one’s invented sky-hooks yet).

Just to be clear – we don’t normally take on any custom-sized linings, indeed as a purely business decision it was up there with the chocolate tea urn I got from eBay last year. But everyone wants to be involved with the games in London this summer.

This is the interior of the boats before we made the linings:

And this is what it looked like with our custom linings fitted:

If you need linings made for marquees then please contact us.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Marquee linings tip

Monday, June 11th, 2012

This is something we learnt over the years.

It’s very difficult keeping marquee linings clean, especially when you’re flat out and they’re going up and down every weekend. To start with we used a commercial cleaning company who turned round the linings within 2 days, the only problem with that is the linings came back crinkled, we’d often get comments from customers that they needed an iron -we even hired a steamer for one particular wedding as the wrinkled linings were so bad.

Most linings fit into a domestic washing machine -all of our DIY Marquees are designed that way intentionally. Pleated linings up to 9mx3m can fit but you need a commercial washing machine for 12m and 15m.

So here’s my recommendation -wash the marquee linings at home in your domestic washing machine but only do it just before putting your marquee up the next time it’s out. Don’t put the linings in a dryer, put them up damp:

  • The linings dry very quickly
  • The linings dry in place, so no creases
  • You avoid having to use dryers – our biggest cause of small tears and damage
  • Make sure your hands are clean, damp linings will pick up any dirt (we used to keep a pack of baby wipes in the van for this)

If your linings are really bad (if they’ve been stored damp for a long time for example) and have mould on then simple washing won’t get it out, it needs something more drastic. Spraying a small amount of bleach will usually get rid of patches, if the area affected is large you actually have to soak the linings in bleach, just make sure you wash them thoroughly afterwards and don’t leave them soaking for too long as it damages the velcro etc.

I hope that’s helped some people out there, thanks for reading.

Spencer

Dirty marquee linings

Monday, December 5th, 2011

Now we all like to think that we keep our marquee equipment clean and well maintained at all times. Sadly that’s not always the case and this is especially true of linings, you can open a bag of linings that you swore were clean when the last marquee came down but now have a variety of marks on them.

If you’ve got spare linings in your stock then that’s fine, just put the dirty ones to one side and clean them before you need them again. The problem is often you don’t have spare linings and you simply have to use them so you have 2 options:

1. Clean them on site (or take them back to be cleaned and return them). There are mould away sprays available, if not bleach for small spots

2. Failing that then put the marked linings in the least obvious place, roofs should be at one end not in the middle of the marquee where everyone’s going to notice and any walls with marks on could go behind the DJ/Band for eg. Not ideal but if you’re on site with no other choice but to use the linings it’s the best you can do.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Non-damaging way of getting a fixing on a lining

Monday, October 10th, 2011

There won’t be an entry next week as we’ll be down setting up our stand at The Showmans Show, yes I’ve mentioned it many times but this blog is aimed at marquee hire companies and it is simply the one show you must visit for the industry. Please stop by and say hello 🙂

I posted this last year but it has proved very popular and I keep referring people to it so here it is again:

Nearly every time you use a marquee lining it will be to go in your standard marquee stock and (if it’s one of ours!) will fit perfectly. Easy.

But sometimes you have to fit a lining somewhere unusual. It might be lining a customers porch, it might be lining an unusual walkway or just making good to a house. At some time in your marquee hiring life you will need to do this.

So how do you get attachments in a lining without damaging it? Follow these instructions:

Step 1: Find a decent sized pebble (about 4cm diameter ideally) and place it on the good face of the lining (ie the side you don’t need to get a fixing)

Step 2: Scrunch the material round the pebble at the back of the lining

Step3: Tie a cable tie tightly around the scrunched material and also include an extra cable tie (this gives you your fixing).

And there you have it, a fixing in the middle of a lining that looks okay from the front (you can’t see the pebble) and gives you a fixing at the back without damaging the lining.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Fairy lights in marquees

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

Many years ago we did a Xmas wedding marquee. The bride and groom wanted lots of Xmas trees with fairy lights, fairy lights in the roof, fairy lights around the sides. If any guest stood in one spot for too long they’d probably want fairy lights on them too!

Sadly this was pre-internet so sourcing white strings of fairy lights turned out to be an impossible task. So I spent 2 days covering green strings of fairy lights with white insulation tape!

Xmas trees with fairy lights? -no problem as long as you’ve got plenty of extension leads to run round the marquee. Xmas trees in the roof? -no problem you can hang them above or below linings and they look good.

Fairy lights around the side of a marquee are slightly trickier and I remember just thinking I’d get on site and ‘wing it’. The problem is people really want them hung around the eaves, but that’s where the swag is. One option is to drape them round and round the swag but I didn’t think that looked very good. So in the end I came up with going behind the swag and poking each fairy light up through the velcro holding it on to the roof so just the bulb is showing. The end result is surprisingly good (sadly the photos are long gone).

For weddings or occasions where people just want subtle lighting effects I think just having fairy lights criss crossing the ceiling is perfect. But for those customers who just want fairy lights everywhere then above the swags is very effective.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

PS Apologies for the delay, I was out of the country yesterday

Getting fixings in a lining without damaging it

Monday, November 29th, 2010

Nearly every time you use a marquee lining it will be to go in your standard marquee stock and (if it’s one of ours!) will fit perfectly. Easy.

But sometimes you have to fit a lining somewhere unusual. It might be lining a customers porch, it might be lining an unusual walkway or just making good to a house. At some time in your marquee hiring life you will need to do this.

So how do you get attachments in a lining without damaging it? Follow these instructions:

Step 1: Find a decent sized pebble (about 4cm diameter ideally) and place it on the good face of the lining (ie the side you don’t need to get a fixing)

Step 2: Scrunch the material round the pebble at the back of the lining

Step3: Tie a cable tie tightly around the scrunched material and also include an extra cable tie (this gives you your fixing).

And there you have it, a fixing in the middle of a lining that looks okay from the front (you can’t see the pebble) and gives you a fixing at the back without damaging the lining.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Marquee swags and holiday

Monday, August 9th, 2010

I mainly use this blog to pass on advice or tips that I’d have liked to have known when I was starting up a marquee hire business. I sometimes use it to announce new products as i. they’ll be designed with hirers in mind and ii. I need to make a living! Very occasionally I’ll use it to make announcements.

This is one of the latter.

Marquee swags: We make roof linings in large batches, when people order a marquee swag upgrade we then take a made roof and add the velcro so the new swags can be attached (or left off to still use as a pelmet finish).

We’ve had several instances where people have ordered roof linings and assume that we remember/look up the fact that they need velcro on for their previously purchased swags.  Please don’t do this, always always specify you require velcro when ordering new roof linings -we offer it free but we don’t offer it as standard.

I’m away next week (there’s a barrel of cote de rhone red with my name on) but the factory’s still open (some might say running more efficiently in my absence) if you want to order anything.

Thanks for reading

Spencer.

Marquee swags and pelmets, there’s a knack.

Sunday, June 20th, 2010

Anyone who has a DIY Marquee with our swag upgrade or 9m+ wide linings will know that swags and pelmets are velcroed on once all the other linings are up. The idea is they are there to give a finishing touch to the lining (and they hide all manner of cables and fixings).

If you just velcro the swags up in place without much thought then it will show, these uneven swags for example:

uneven swags
Apologies for the photo quality but you can make out the swags are uneven and not stretched out.

Here’s what they should look like:

good swags
You can see they’re straight and evenly spaced out.

The trick is to pull the swags out straight as you go. The swags don’t need to be velcroed to the roof every inch of the way, if the roof is bunched up a little then pull the swag across it before velcroing. Try to bypass any Velcro that rises up a little on the roof if you can, this will keep the swags looking more even.

Thanks for reading.

Spencer.