Archive for the ‘marquee hire advice’ Category

Marquee Heaters

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

If there’s one thing that you want to get right it’s heating, if people are cold it’ll ruin their night no matter what the marquee looks like.

So here are things to bear in mind with marquee heaters:

  • Always always use ones with a fan in, you need to be able to throw the heat around the marquee. Halogen heaters*, patio heaters, cabinet heaters, table heaters are all useless in a marquee. Indirect heaters and space heaters are the best.
  • Think about the layout of your marquee, heaters should be positioned near seating areas and pointing towards doors or anywhere heat will escape from. Don’t have them pointing towards a dance floor.
  • In April/May and September/October you will just need heaters to heat the marquee up before people arrive and at the end of the evening when the temperature drops
  • In Dec/Jan/Feb you need at least twice as many heaters to make sure it’s toasty all night. I always made sure there were enough heaters to make the marquee uncomfortably hot, that way you always know your customer is in complete control (assuming they’re all adjustable).
  • If there’s snow forecast make sure your customer knows to have the heaters on regularly to melt it off the roof. If it builds up that’s a lot of weight to be on top of your marquee. Even if it means you have to go out with more fuel it’s worth making sure no snow settles on your marquee.

It’s got to be said the ideal heaters are indirect ones, they’re large units that sit outside the marquee and are controlled by a thermostat so the customer has complete control. They can be powered by gas or diesel, we preferred gas as it’s easier but lots of people prefer diesel. The only problem is indirect heaters are very expensive.

Indirect heaters typically cost £1500 and hire out for £150-£200.
Space heaters cost £100-£200 and hire out for £50-£90 but they’re quite noisy, not incredibly child friendly (a grate stops anyone touching the flame) and give off water vapour when burning gas.
* Knowing we’d be busy with the showmans show I wrote this 3 weeks ago, since then I’ve been to Paris (on business -which sounds good but really it was just an excuse to see my brother in law) and eaten outside under a halogen heater. I’ll concede that maybe in small (3m/4m) draughtless marquees they may be useful to take the chill off. In winter I’d still go with a fan heater.
Thanks for reading
Spencer

Marquee Linings

Monday, October 13th, 2008

Some new satin linings have been making their way into the industry, I’m not keen and think people should be very wary before buying them. Here’s why:

 

We’ve been making marquee linings for 15-20 years -it’s how I originally got in to the marquee hire industry. We’re certainly nowhere near the biggest manufacturer but we do a good job and everything’s made by us in the UK. Basically, when it comes to marquee linings we like to think we know what we’re talking about.

 

For those who don’t know most marquee linings manufactured in the UK use an ivory polyester, although there’s seemingly 101 different shades of ivory an industry standard is slowly filtering through so they all match. Linings made in China use satin material and with the quantities made in China probably outnumber the polyester ones in the world.

 

But you’re not reading this for facts, you’re reading this for my opinion. And my opinion is satin marquee linings are crap. Shiny satin linings look cheap and just lack the class of their polyester counterparts.

 

Satin linings:

  • Are made from cheaper inferior material
  • Reflect the light (not a good thing appearance-wise)
  • Are made in the cheapest method possible, this generally means the walls are attached to the roofs and no finishing pelmet or swag is used.

 

If you do buy satin linings make make sure they satisfy BS 7837: 1996 for flammability, you should receive a certificate with any new marquee linings. A lot of marquees and linings made in China are intended for the US market, unfortunately their flammability test requirements are lower than British Standards.

If you take nothing else away from reading this blog take this:

Just because something states it’s flame rertardant doesn’t mean it satisfies british standards -always insist on a copy of the test report satisfying BS 7837: 1996

As always, thanks for reading

Spencer

Which marquees give the greatest return on investment?

Monday, September 29th, 2008

A recent email exchange with someone in the industry annoyed me a little bit so I thought I’d explain on here -writing a blog is a form of therapy after all 🙂

 

For those who don’t realise there’s basically three types of marquee appropriate for marquee hire companies to use:

  • Traditional canvas marquees
  • Aluminium frame clearspan marquees
  • Steel pipe frame clearspan marquees (like our DIY marquees)

There’s other gazebos, pop-ups and party tents available but none of them are really suited to the hire industry.

 

-Neither of us like traditional canvas marquees. They have their place for some companies but neither of us wanted to get involved with them.

-Both of us like aluminium frame structures, no argument there the 9m & 12m wide stuff is very impressive.

-But he’s missing a trick by not using steep pipe marquees for his 6m wide stock.

 

When I ran our hire company we had 6m, 9m and 12m wide marquees. 6m wide steel pipe marquees are the most lucrative, offering the best return on investment (ROI) of any of the 3 sizes.

In fact about the only thing we had that offered a better ROI was fairy lights (buy for £30, hire out for £30).

 

So for all you entrepreneurs out there who don’t suffer from marquee snobbery, here’s some figures:

 

 

6m x 12m DIY Marquee

6m x 12m Aluminium frame marquee

Cost new (with linings)

£1350

Approx £8500

Expected rental (varies greatly with area)

£600+

£600+

Expected life span in the hire industry

Marquee: 2-4 years

Linings: 4-5 years

Windows 2-3 years

Linings: 4-5 years

PVC 5 years

Metalwork 20 years

 


 

I think it’s reasonable to assume:

-you have £8500 to spend

-you rent out a marquee for on average 20 weekends a year

-your profit is 50%

 

 

DIY Marquees

Aluminium frame marquee

Initial outlay

-£8,100 (6 lined marquees)

-£8,500 (1 lined marquee)

Return from 2 years hiring

£72,000 (6*2*20*£300)

£12,000 (2*20*£300)

Profit after 2 years

£63,900

£3,500

 

 

 

Replacement stock

-£5,100 (replace 6 marquees)

-£400 (replace 4 windows)

Return from further 2 years hiring

£72,000

£12,000

Profit after 4 years

£130,800

£15,100

 

£130,800 vs £15,100!! I really don’t see there’s any argument.

 

As anyone will recognise this is a simplified version of a business. You can’t rely on getting 20 bookings all paying full price if you’re starting up a new company, but then that’s the case no matter which style of marquee you use.

This doesn’t take in to consideration extras like flooring, lighting, furniture etc which are all lucrative in their own right –a lot of companies refuse to do an empty marquee. Surely having 6 marquees gives you greater opportunity to make money from extras than having one marquee?

 

If you’re starting a business or replenishing your 6m wide stock buying DIY Marquees gives you the best return on investment available.

 

I’ve tried to state the facts and figures in an unbiased manner, I just think there’s a few people out there who need to remember why we’re in this business -putting food on your children’s plate/putting beer in your pint glass, whatever’s your motivation.

 

Thanks for reading, I hope I’ve given some people something to think about.

 

Spencer.

Coconut matting

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008

Ever gone in to a marquee and the matting looks like the waves on an angry sea? Assuming it was laid correctly there’s actually a very simple reason.

As mentioned in a previous post coconut matting is a very popular way of flooring marquees. Harder wearing and longer lasting than carpet, more attractive (in a lot of peoples opinion) and cheaper than plastic flooring it’s the flooring most marquee hire companies use.

So why does it ruckle up so much even if noone’s been walking on it?

The answer is it’s because it’s a natural fibre and absorbs moisture. If you floor a marquee with matting on a sunny afternoon no matter how tightly you stretched it the following morning it will be all ruckled – it absorbs the moisture from the dew and expands.
So the lesson is if you’re faced with ruckled matting (whether it’s you in the marquee or your customer panicking on the phone) don’t relay it! Wait until the afternoon for it to dry out and it should go back to it’s previous flat self.

Of course if it’s still ruckled in the afternoon it means it wasn’t laid correctly -try stretching it tighter or space the nails closer together.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Getting your marquee website up the search rankings (part 2)

Monday, September 15th, 2008

Lisa from County Marquees made a good point after part 1 -google offer a free tool to research keywords. In my experience this is very useful but not detailed enough to get more specific data (impressions for marquee hire Reigate wouldn’t appear for example).
If you haven’t read part 1 you should go read that first otherwise this won’t make sense (or be practical to carry out).

Optimising your website for your chosen keywords

This step is the hardest. You can do it yourself but it takes a lot of trial and error -it took me over a year to learn. Apparently there are some programs available to do this step but most people seem to pay a professional to optimise their site(s).

Optimising takes 2-3 days and the going rate seems £600-£1000. If you’ve bought some of our marquees then I’d offer to do this at the same rate I charge my mates (£300 currently). I’d prefer not to though as my workload is pretty big but we try to make sure we look after existing customers.

Creating a linking strategy

This sounds complicated but actually is pretty easy.

Inbound links (links from other sites to your site) count as a ‘vote’ for your site. The more relevant the website that’s linking to you the better quality the vote. So a link from a marquee hire advice blog like this would count more than a link from a carpenters for example. Make sense?

If you do nothing else apply for a link from the marquee hire section of the Open Directory although this might take 6 months it’s a very highly regarded directory.

Lastly try to build up links slowly, you’re punished if all your links appear overnight.

I’m not sure I’ve explained this incredibly well, if you need clarification of anything don’t hesitate to contact me and I’ll talk you through it.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Getting your marquee website up the search rankings (part 1)

Monday, September 8th, 2008

Website’s are great things (you’re reading one so let’s assume you know that already!). The bigger you get the more time work and effort should go in to it, especially getting it up the search rankings.

There are 3 steps to getting your marquee hire site up the rankings:

  1. Do some research on what keywords and phrases you want to target
  2. Optimise your website for your chosen keywords
  3. Carry out a linking strategy

I’m going to cover number 1 today and 2 & 3 next week.

Researching keywords & phrases

Ignoring the fact I can’t legally set up a marquee hire company due to the contract I signed when selling our old company let’s imagine I was starting a new hire company -Spencer’s marquees (I like it already).

The first thing is to be realistic.  You’re not going to get top of the rankings for ‘marquee hire’ without paying a professional upwards of £15k/yr (actually good value, we spent more on Yellow Pages years ago). But think about it, unless you’re covering all of the UK you don’t want to be.

I live in Reigate so I’d imagine the terms I want to get are ‘marquee hire reigate’, ‘marquee hire redhill’, ‘marquee hire surrey’ that kind of thing. But before I go any further I need to make sure & do some research.

First thing is to set up a google adwords account -there’s always offers & vouchers around for adwords so look around for those before you sign up. £20/£30 free is typical (when you pay £10). For those who don’t know google adwords are the paid adverts that appear on the right (and sometimes above) any google search. It’s how they make their money.
The next thing to do is put as many phrases into that keyword list as possible. We all know there’ll be lots of searches for ‘marquees’ and ‘marquee hire’ but you need to get inventive, when researching I’ll typically have 60-100 keyword phrases in this list (google suggests some too). Set each bid to the minimum bid 2 or 3p.

Here’s the ironic thing -obviously it’s nice getting people to click through to your website but you’re not bothered if they do or not. What you need is the column marked ‘impressions’. This shows the number of people who have searched through google for that keyword phrase since you started your campaign. Easy research huh?

Check back regularly to make sure no keywords have become inactive then leave it for 2-8 weeks until there’s an established pattern and you know which keywords you want to use.

Until this research is finished you can’t move on to step 2.

A lot of companies will call you up promising to get you “to the top of the google rankings”. The problems with these companies are:

  1. What keywords are they promising to get you to the top for? It’s pointless getting to the top for googling ‘Spencer’s Marquees’, that’s not going to bring in more business it’s just going to increase my ego (which I’m quite happy with)
  2. These companies will only do step 3 of my list above. They’ll quote ‘a recent google white paper’ that mentions you need quality inbound links, which is true but ignores keyword research and optimising your site which is far more important. Don’t give them your money, it’s not worth it.

Don’t believe I know what I’m talking about? Google ‘marquee hire advice’ and this blog is usually number 1. Google ‘marquee for sale’ and our domestic sales site is usually number 1.

Thanks for reading.

Spencer

Marquee Hire Websites

Sunday, August 31st, 2008

If you’re starting a marquee hire business you should have a website. It’s not essential, to start with you’ve probably got more things on your mind but you should certainly get one sooner rather than later.

What should you put on a website?

  • Photos and lots of them. People will visit your website wanting an idea of what you do. Photos are the easiest way to do this.
  • Make all wording reassuring. People want to know you’re reliable and will turn up with their marquee.
  • It’s up to you whether you put a full price list online, certainly some ideas of prices will help.
  • Contact details
  • Keep it simple, clean and tidy. Don’t start putting loads of special effects or use coloured backgrounds -keep the background white or a very light colour and only use special effects if they’re functional (slide shows for example).

My next couple of articles will be about getting your website up the search rankings. If you want to do this you’ll need to be able to change several things – the title, description, and a few other features which some website design programs don’t allow you to do.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

DJ Areas

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

When planning DJ areas try putting yourself in a DJ’s shoes:

I was pointed to this forum recently: DJ forum

There’s one post that was perfect for us so I’ve quoted it in full here:

“Fortunately I only do a couple of marquee gigs each year, but there are four main reasons why I have a strong disliking for these functions:

1) The ground is always uneven, meaning you usually have to put piles of disco cards under your stands & tripods to level them up…and this looks rubbish.

2) If its been raining, then can be very muddy. I had this problem big time at one particular gig last year.

3) They often have a dodgy power supply, either from a generator or from extension leads from a nearby building…and you’re never sure if they are being shared by caterers or the lighting.

4) Lack of headroom. Being at the side of the marquee, we are normally in the area where the roof is at its lowest, and I often find that I don’t have the 9 feet height required by my main lighting tripod.”

Okay, so lets deal with these points in order:

1. There’s not much you can do about uneven surfaces. Don’t increase the dance floor to accomodate DJ’s – dancing will make the records jump etc.

2. Encourage customers to have flooring if there’s any chance of it being muddy. It makes for a better party and means DJ (and your) equipment stays clean.

3. Try to make sure you have a completely separate power lead for the DJ, either their own extension lead from the house or a separate lead from the generator so it doesn’t conflict with anything else.

4. When designing your customers’ layout try to have the DJ area at one end rather than to one side, this means they’ll have greater headroom and also looks more impressive.

I’d also add a couple of my own points too:

5. If possible allow for access in to the back of the DJ area, this saves equipment being carried through eating/greeting areas.

6. If you’ve got lighting controls position them near the DJ, this allows him/her to dim them down when starting their set and helps control the atmosphere.

Thanks to Rob James Entertainment for letting me quote their forum post & thanks for reading

Spencer

Toilet hire

Monday, August 18th, 2008

It may not be something you want to get involved in, but customers will expect you to provide toilets if required.

All loos are not the same!

There are luxury trailer units.

There are ‘bog standard’ plastic cubicles.

There are units in between.

Toilets are nothing to stress over, it’s just a lot easier if you have contacts in place and ideas of prices before you speak to customers. You should also have an idea of what kind of access is required for each method.

Building up a relationship with a supplier like Sweet pea luxury toilets is very useful. You can get set prices which are usually discounted to marquee hire companies -this means you charge the customer the same price as they’d be charged anyway and you make some commission for making the booking.

Luxury trailer units aren’t that manoeuvrable so allow plenty of access space for them to be reversed in if required and allow 10ft/3m headroom. It’s also worth noting which side the doors are when positioning them (generally on the drivers side).

Middle of the range trailer units are the same as the luxury ones but without the gold plated taps, piped music & fitted carpets. Space-wise you still have to allow for a large trailer to be manoeuvred.

Plastic cubicles are generally 1m square and can be moved up to 10m away from vehicle access (the cubicles are pumped out before lifting back so it depends on how long their pipes are). You need to allow enough room for a large flatbed van or lorry to reverse in and ideally the cubicles wouldn’t be lifted very far.

All the different toilet units should be self-contained so there’s no need for water supplies or drainage. Just remember that the trailer units will need a power supply (clarify if you run this or the toilet company) and the cubicles might need a light inside (they don’t come as standard).

Summary: Get some toilet hire contacts and get an idea of prices

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Getting yourself known

Thursday, August 7th, 2008

Early post as I’m away next week:

Once you’ve decided to go into marquee hire don’t just sit on your backside expecting the bookings to come rolling in. Get out there making contacts (networking seems to be the popular phrase for this).

This is the bread & butter of marquee hire companies.

When organising an event some people won’t go to the marquee company first. They might go to the caterer, the florist, the DJ. Everyone’s different. Getting in with these people is a MUST.

Fill your pockets with business cards and leaflets, put your best charm hat on and if possible go and meet people face to face. If not send them some literature and follow it up with a phone call.
Do some research and find all the catering companies, DJ’s, Bands, florists, party planners and any site where you’ve seen marquees up or think marquees might be of interest -National trust properties, large pubs, hotels etc.
You need to explain:

  • How easy to work with you are (you want to work with these people)
  • How reliable you are (you want them to recommend you)
  • How new and well maintained your equipment is

Some people work on commission for recommendations. Personally I always avoided paying any commission and relied on a ‘you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours’ approach, however I think I’m in the minority and if you get regular business from such arrangements losing 10% of it is manageable.

As a final note some people will actually contact other local marquee hire companies to get on good terms with them. That way if you or they need to cross-hire anything you have communications in place.