Archive for the ‘Dance Floors’ Category

How big a dance floor do I need in my marquee?

Monday, February 17th, 2014

A very common question. The way to work it out is to multiply the number of guests by 2.5 and that’s the square footage dance floor area you would typically need.

There are some caveats to add to that though:

  • This assumes only around a half of guests would be dancing, if you know you have a more active than average group then go bigger.
  • This does not include space for a Band or DJ -NEVER put them on the same surface (ie on the dance floor) as their equipment can jump around.
  • Larger dance floors (or even a fully boarded marquee) may be needed for more active group style dances like a ceileih, callee, kaleigh, barn dance.
  • Don’t get too hung up about the size of the dance floor, if it gets very busy then the dance floor is often just a starting point as people then dance just off it anyway.

Some examples:

  • 60 guests = 150 square feet so typical size dance floors: 10x15ft, 12x12ft
  • 100 guests = 250 square feet so typical size dance floors: 12x20ft, 16x16ft
  • 160 guests = 400 square feet so typical size dance floor: 20x20ft

As always if in doubt just contact us and we’ll be more than happy to advise.

A new design of our website is being launched over the next 2 weeks so don’t be alarmed if you notice some changes -please let us know if you find any mistakes though!

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Stacking, storing and transporting marquee dance floors

Monday, October 1st, 2012

The design of marquee dance floors are all very similar, battens across the back and small battens/teeth at one end. This enables the dance floor to lay nicely and each board to lock in with each other:

Back of dance floor board

There are a few issues with storing and transporting dance floors. If not stored correctly the surface can get damaged, if not stacked correctly the pile can be unstable (a pile of dance floor tipping over in a van is not good for the heart-rate) and a damp dance floor left in store can become mouldy or warped.

So this is what we did for all of our dance floors:

We would always try to transport dance floor boards face-to-face, that way you protect the surface. Carrying them in pairs helps this process but it depends on the muscle power available.

In transit we would stagger the pairs of boards so one pair had teeth at one end whilst the next pair had teeth at the other (see diagram above), this way the dance floor is nice and compact but still laying flat.

When storing the boards away we would use a slightly different system of putting the boards batten on top of batten (it’s not incredibly clear by my dodgy diagram but all battens should line up on top of each other!). The idea of this is that the boards are still flat and still stacked surface-to-surface but the larger gap allows more air around the wood -this allows the wood to dry out and ultimately will last longer before needing replacement.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Sad news

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

Some sad news: Joe Weston-Webb passed away last week. Most people know him through his portable flooring range including dance floors and furniture but also as being one of life’s true eccentrics, he’ll be sorely missed in the industry. RIP Grumpy Joe.

How to lay a marquee dance floor

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Before I start on marquee dance floors I should mention that this week we have a 4x8m and one of our new 9x12m DIY Marquees for sale on eBay.

Nearly all marquee dance floors go together in the same manner using a brick type pattern for strength:

  1. Plan the position of the dance floor carefully. Often you can decide which way to lay the boards (across or down the marquee). If you think the customer might want to increase or decrease the size of dance floor at a later stage then orientate the boards accordingly. So  you only have to add or remove rows rather than lifting the whole floor to alter the size.
  2. Lay the first two or three rows of boards down and then stop: check the dance floor is square and going to fit in line with your desired position.
  3. Ensure there are no gaps between the boards, once the whole dance floor is laid it is very difficult to go back and change it
  4. Similarly pack up the boards as each row is laid to avoid any bouncy gaps underneath. It is a nightmare trying to pack up a bouncy dance floor once all the boards are laid
  5. Once all boards are down it is time to lay the edging. Firstly put the sides of the edging on – this is laid in the same way as the boards. So if the last row put down was big-big-small then your edging should be laid as small-big-big to continue the brick pattern
  6. Once both sides are fitted any corner pieces of edging can be put in and the gaps at both ends filled using the remaining edging.
  7. If you’re a bit short of edging then leave it off on the side facing the DJ/Band

All of this may seem common knowledge but to others it could prove interesting. I remember going on site to find one lad so frustrated with the hour that he’d spent trying to edge a dance floor that he was in the middle of hacksawing a piece down to fit. Once I’d shown him how it was supposed to fit blood pressures were lowered and the hacksaw was put back in the van!

Thanks for reading

Spencer

Marquees on sand

Monday, June 28th, 2010

There are times when you’ll be asked to put marquees up on all sorts of different surfaces, one of which is sand. There are a couple of things to be aware of:

Anchoring the marquee down. If the marquee is going up on a sand school then the ground will probably be solid enough under the layer of sand to take marquee stakes as if it were on grass. If it’s on a beech then the soft sand will go deeper so you need longer stakes, more of them or heavy weights.

Dance floors. If you put a dance floor down on sand or even on top of carpet with sand outside eventually the sand will work its way on to the dance floor. From experience I know that’s a bad thing. We didn’t even consider the implications of doing a large wedding marquee on a sand school until we went to pick the marquee up afterwards – the sand had been walked in to the marquee and on to the dance floor. Throw in 150 people strutting their stuff and the effect was like sandpaper scratching our lovely parquet dance floor all night! An expensive lesson learnt.

If you are offering a dance floor in a marquee near sand then use one that can be re-stained (wooden dance floor) or incorporate in to the price re-lacquering the top surface.

Thanks for reading.

Spencer.