Archive for November, 2014

Case study: Mr Jones wants to cover as much of his garden with marquees as possible

Monday, November 24th, 2014

We recently had a visit by a Mr Jones, he was planning a party and wanted to extend his house in to the garden using marquees. This is a pretty common scenario for marquee hire companies especially during the winter months.

Mr Jones came in with a diagram of his garden with the marquees he thought he need, two 4x6m marquees, one 3.6×3.6m pagoda and one walkway:

Jones01

The garden is not easy as it’s a very funny shape and on the surface this looks to do the job. My concerns were:

  • Weathering to the house would be difficult. The 4x6m marquee against the house should at least be a 6x4m one for ease of weathering. A pagoda is sloped on all 4 sides and so difficult to weather against a house.
  • There would be many joins. This is not a problem regarding weatherproofing with our guttering kits but it can be a hindrance to party atmosphere and circulation. The risk is the end 4x6m marquee would feel cut-off and under-used (note if this layout went ahead a good suggestion would be to put the food and/or drink in this 4x6m to ensure it is used).
  • Walkways are ideal for connecting marquees together but in this scenario you aren’t really gaining any useable space by having the walkway in the middle there. It’s a bit like a sideways corridor.

So having explained all of this I suggested an alternative approach, a 4x12m marquee and a 4x4m marquee on the side:

Jones02

  • This is much easier to weather against the house (both marquees would have their flat gables towards the house)
  • There is only one join and it is much easier to weather the two marquees side by side
  • You have a larger main area for the guests to circulate.

Note that in this example Mr Jones is actually ending up with slightly less of his garden covered and my alternative option is cheaper than his original suggestion. I can however guarantee that this second idea will be an improvement on the atmosphere and circulation of the party.

As mentioned in other articles I would still recommend having the food and drink out in the marquee (maybe at the far end). People (especially blokes) linger by the bar, having the food and drink outside guarantees the marquees are used fully and everyone doesn’t end up in the kitchen.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

How to look after marquee linings

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Marquee linings give a real wow factor to any marquee but they do need looking after. This means keeping them clean and as crease-free as possible.

Please note this advice is for the luxury marquee linings that we (and one or two others) manufacture here in the UK. It is not suitable for the cheap satin linings made in the far east.

How do I know if my linings are luxury or satin? Satin material is white/silver, very shiny and prone to wrinkling. Luxury lining material is usually (but not exclusively) ivory/cream with a matt finish.

Tips on looking after marquee linings:

  • Keep them dry. Just like marquee covers if you put linings away wet they will reappear mouldy.
  • The ideal way to store linings is neatly folded – that’s how we (and by we I mean the ladies here who are far better at this than the rest of us) store our linings here. However on site folding isn’t practical so the next best is to concertina the material and then roll it up. The last thing you want to be doing is scrunching up a lining to fit in to a bag or something. Luxury lining material is not as prone to creases as satin but if left for a long time scrunched up they will form.
  • Make sure your hands are clean before starting to play with any lining.
  • Keep the linings clean – if they’re dirty after a job put them to one side for cleaning.
  • Our linings can be washed in a normal domestic washing machine, they are inherently flame retardant so can be washed any number of times.
  • Stubborn mildew may need bleaching first (and then washed thoroughly)
  • Putting the linings up when they’re damp (ie straight out of the washing machine) means they dry in place and you don’t have any creases at all.
  • If you do have lots of creases in your lining then a steamer will get them out ( can take a while though!)
  • Have set bags for your linings, ideally ones that are colour coded – there is nothing worse than being at a job and finding you’ve packed the wrong size roof lining!
  • Most of the time dirt on linings comes from dirty hands when fitting, a dirty floor or in transport if not properly protected. Being thorough at these times will give your marquee a better standard of finish and avoid you being tied up regularly cleaning linings .

We have been manufacturing marquee linings for over 20 years, if you need any advice on linings (whether for our marquees or not) we are always happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thanks for reading

Spencer