Archive for December, 2012

Merry Christmas and thank you

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Merry Christmas and thank you to all of our old and new customers and especially to anyone who takes 2 minutes out of their day to come here and read the ramblings of an old ex-marquee-erector.

Our Christmas opening hours are: well, essentially we’re closed! This Friday 21st Dec is our last day (don’t expect our usual immaculate customer service in the afternoon <hic>) and we’ll be opening again on Wednesday 2nd January.

If you have any issues that you need some urgent advice on then send us an email and I’ll do my best to fight through the pounding headache of a hangover and the pounding ears of toddlers playing with the packaging of expensive toys to answer.

If you haven’t received the circular then Essential Supplies are running some PAT testing and Marquee electrics courses next year, speak to Lauren if you’re interested.

Let’s all hope for a successful and marquee-covered 2013

Thanks for reading all year

Spencer

How much heating does my marquee need?

Monday, December 10th, 2012

Very simply one this, to raise a marquees temperature by 20degrees you require 1KW/3500BTU for 5 cubic metres.

Some examples:

  • 4x4m Commercial DIY Marquee (average height is 2.5m) = 4x4x2.5 = 40 cubic metres so requires 8KW/28,000BTU’s
  • 6x12m Commercial DIY Marquee (average height 2.5m) = 6x12x2.5 = 180 cubic metres so requires 36KW/126,000BTU’s
  • 9x12m Deluxe DIY Marquee (average height 3.05m) = 9x12x3.05 = 329.4 cubic metres so requires 66KW/231,000BTU’s

Some things to point out:

  • Most room thermostats are around the 20degree mark so if it’s below freezing outside allow for more heating
  • If there are going to be lots of openings to the outside (rather than another marquee/the house) then allow for more heating
  • If it’s a formal evening function (think ladies in evening dresses) then allow more heating
  • Better to have several heat sources to create a more even room temperature than one large heat source which risks creating too hot and too cold areas in the marquee.
  • If it’s an 18th birthday party where everyone will be drinking and/or dancing then you can probably allow less heating

In short, I would always treat this number as a bare minimum, much better to have more heating than required so it can be turned down than risk having a function ruined through lack of heat.

The sort of figures quoted here can only realistically be achieved using gas or diesel/oil powered heaters. Save yourself a headache and avoid using any electrically powered heaters or infra-red heaters. They’re fine for taking the chill off on a patio or outside a pub, they are inadequate (not to mention expensive to run) in a marquee of any decent size.

Thanks for reading.

Spencer.

Winter marquees take longer to build

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

Erecting winter marquees isn’t the most glamorous of jobs but  it can still be enjoyable. The key is to allow more time for each one (compared to peak summer times).

Allowing more time for each marquee means:

  • The work days can be shorter, if you’re not really busy then there’s no need to work very late
  • Sites will naturally take more effort during the winter (clearing snow, weathering to buildings etc)
  • Work can be done in shifts, the general winter practice was to put up the marquee then have a break as soon as the heater could be made operational. Suddenly with working heaters the marquee becomes a much more pleasant environment to work in for the flooring and linings etc (and you’re ‘just testing’ to make sure the heating is satisfactory for the customer)
  • Maintenance will take a bit longer as everything’s likely to get wetter and muddier during the winter.

I’m aware I’m saying this from a warm comfortable indoor office but providing you are not in a hurry and you’ve got suitable clothing then winter marquees can be just as enjoyable as summer ones.

Thanks for reading

Spencer

PS – check out our updated instructional videos page, we’ll be adding more videos to it over time